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Mathematics Courses Descriptions/Publishers

FOUR credits required. *Algebra I, or an equivalent course is required and Geometry are required courses.

*Algebra IA, IB, Algebra I or Algebra I Honors are equivalent courses only one will count. Note: Algebra IA and Algebra IB count as one credit towards the Bright Futures Scholarship.

College Preparatory Track (Meets the requirements for the Bright Futures Scholarship) A total of four math credits at the Algebra I level and above.
Algebra I
Geometry
Algebra II as the foundation, then adding:
College Algebra, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry to complete the requirements

The Standard Diploma Track still requires Algebra I or an equivalent course(s) and Geometry, but can then be followed by Business Math and Consumer Math instead of Algebra II, etc.

Click on the course name below to download the detailed course description in PDF form. Below each course code number and name is a brief description of the course.

1200300 Pre-Algebra
Develops the skills necessary for success in Algebra I.  Topics include, but are not limited to, variables, number theory, equations, and inequalities, rational numbers, exponents, formulas, algebraic equations, and the Pythagorean theorem. This course does not meet the Algebra I requirement, or qualify as a math course for the FAS or FMS scholarships. This course is normally taken in the 7th or 8th grades. If used by a high school student, it is considered a remedial course.

 

1200310 Algebra I     Duplicate course Algebra IA & IB, Algebra I Honors
This course is a full year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Pre-Algebra. Within the Algebra I course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving and graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.
Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts:
• Solve single variable, absolute value, and linear systems of equations.
• Solve and graph single variable, absolute value, and linear inequalities.
• Evaluate, solve, and graph linear and quadratic functions as well as conceptualize the relationship between the independent and dependent variable of a function.
• Understand and know how to apply the distance, midpoint, and slope formulas as well as the Pythagorean theorem.
• Form an equation of a line using the slope-intercept, point-slope and standard forms of a line.
• Organize data in the form of a table or matrix; perform complex matrix operations such as multiplication, evaluating the determinant, and solving a system of linear equations using Cramer's Rule.
• Apply basic fundamental rules of exponents.
• Be able to construct a formula or equation necessary to solve algebraic word problems involving area, perimeter, and linear systems of equations, basic probability and statistical reasoning, distance, and compounding interest.
• Evaluate rational expressions and solve equations with rational expressions.
• Simplify and perform operations with radical expressions and polynomials.
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 

1200320 Algebra I Honors     Duplicate course Algebra IA & IB, Algebra I
This course provides a rigorous and in-depth study of algebra, emphasizing deductive reasoning skills, as a foundation for more advanced mathematics courses and to develop the skills needed to solve mathematical problems.
Topics covered in Algebra 1 Honors shall include, but not be limited to:
• quantitative reasoning;
• laws of integral and rational exponents;
• contextualizing situations to create equations and inequalities;
• solving and the justification of solution of linear, simple exponential, quadratic, and simple radical equations & inequalities;
• working with arithmetic and geometric sequences;
• solving and the justification of solution of linear and quadratic systems of equations and inequalities;
• graphing linear, exponential, and quadratic two variable equations;
• understanding the concept of a function and then use that understanding to construct new functions(functions limited to: linear, quadratic, exponential, and radical functions);
• analyzing functions and their inherent properties;
• finding the inverse of linear and quadratic functions;
• creating linear and exponential models of real world data and then use the models to make predictions;
• simplifying and factoring polynomial expressions;
• proving polynomial identities;
• simplifying radical expressions; summarizing, representing, and interpreting data on single count or measurement data, and two categorical variables;
• using the mean and standard distribution to estimate population percentages.
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 

1200330 Algebra II     Duplicate course Algebra II Honors, Prerequisite: Algebra I
Algebra II is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory, concepts involving linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, and pre-calculus theories. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to basic trigonometric identities and problem solving.
By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:
• Understand set notation and the structure of mathematical systems.
• Know how to use functional notation and operations on functions.
• Simplify and solve algebraic fractions.
• Perform operations on polynomials, including factoring, long division, and synthetic division.
• Solve algebraic word problems involving mixtures, money, integers, and work.
• Evaluate and solve radical expressions and equations.
• Solve systems of equations with graphing, substitution, and matrices.
• Graph and solve quadratic equations, including conic sections.
• Graph and solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
• Calculate permutations, combinations, and complex probabilities.
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 

1200340 Algebra II Honors     Duplicate course Algebra II, Prerequisite: Algebra I
This course continues in the study of the structure of algebra and geometry with emphasis on theory, proof and development of formulas in order to provide the foundation for applying these skills to Pre- Calculus, Statistics, and other mathematical and scientific fields.
Topics shall include but not be limited to:
• studying the following common functions: square root, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, cube root, piecewise defined, and trigonometric);
• being able to describe the key features and then sketch the graph of a function: ( intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; and end behavior);
• understanding the structure and properties of the complex number system; using arithmetic and geometric sequences & series to solve problems;
• understanding the concept of an inverse relation/function;
• performing various function transformations fluently; calculating and interpreting the rate of change of a function;
understanding the structure of polynomial expressions in order to be able to fluently perform factorizations on polynomials;
• proving basic theorems about polynomials;
• being able to fluently solve polynomial equations over the complex number system;
• being able to contextualize a real world situation into a common function the best fits the data;
• fundamentally understanding the unit circle;
• using radian measure to solve problems;
• understanding the basic concepts of independent and conditional probability;
• understanding and evaluating random processes for a given set of statistical data (Non- inferential statistics);
applying the general probabilistic multiplication rule; using permutations and combinations to solve problems.
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 


1200370 Algebra IA
1200380 Algebra IB     Duplicate course Algebra I, Algebra I Honors
Must also take Algebra IB to meet Algebra I requirement. The combination of these two courses refines the algebraic concepts and processes learned in middle school mathematics courses and then use that knowledge to solve a variety of real world and mathematical problems.
Topics covered in Algebra 1 shall include, but not be limited to:
• quantitative reasoning;
• laws of integral and rational exponents;
• contextualizing situations to create equations and inequalities;
•solving and the justification of solution of linear, simple exponential, and quadratic equations & inequalities;
• solving and the justification of solution of linear systems of equations and inequalities;
• graphing linear, exponential, and quadratic two variable equations;
• understanding the concept of a function and then use that understanding to construct new functions(functions limited to: linear, quadratic, exponential, and radical functions);
• analyzing functions and their inherent properties;
• creating linear and exponential models of real world data and then use the models to make predictions;
• simplifying and factoring polynomial expressions;
• simplifying radical expressions;
• summarizing, representing, and interpreting data on single count or measurement data, and two categorical variables.

 

1200700 Math for College Rediness
Are you ready for college success? This course is intended for grade 11 or 12 students, whose test scores on the Postsecondary Educational Readiness Test (P.E.R.T.) are at or below the established cut scores for mathematics, indicating that they are not yet “college ready” in mathematics or simply need some additional instruction in content to prepare them for success in college level mathematics. This course incorporates the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practices as well as the following Common Core Standards for Mathematical Content:
• Expressions and Equations, the Number System,
• Functions, Algebra, Geometry,
• Number and Quantity,
• Statistics and Probability,
• and the Common Core Standards for High School Modeling.
The standards align with the Mathematics Postsecondary Readiness Competencies deemed necessary for entry-level college courses. 
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

1202300 Calculus
An interactive course framework combines with the exciting on-line course delivery to make calculus an adventure. The course includes a study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, and the applications of derivatives and integrals.
Segment 1:
Review of Function Terminology and More, Graphing Calculators, Compositions and Transformations of Functions, Some Common Functions, Introduction to Limits, Properties of Limits, Limits Involving Infinity, Continuity, Applications of Limits, The Derivative, Rules of Differentiation, Trigonometric Derivatives and the Chain Rule, Inverse Functions, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, Derivatives of Exponential, Logarithmic, and Inverse Trig Functions, Implicit Differentiation, Analyzing Functions Part I: Curve Sketching, Analyzing Functions Part II: Maximums and Minimums, Applied Maximum and Minimum Problems, Distance, Velocity, Acceleration, and Rectilinear Motion, Related Rates, The Mean Value Theorem and L'Hôpital's Rule, Linearization
Segment 2:
Area Approximation and Riemann Sums, Introduction to the Definite Integral, The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Integrals and Antiderivatives, Integration by Substitution, The Definite Integral, Finding the Area Under and Between Curves, Volume by Discs (Slicing), Average Value of a Function and Rectilinear Motion Revisited, Differential Equations – An Introduction, Initial Value Problems and Slope Fields , Numerical Approximation Methods with Integrals, Exploring the Graphs of f, f Prime, and f Double Prime, Relative Rates of Growth, Using Calculus with Data in a Table, Functions Defined by Integrals
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math
Florida Virtual School: See FLVS section for enrollment procedures

 

1202310 Advanced Placment Calculus AB
Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to receive Advanced Placement credit and possible College credit.

This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus AB exam given each year in May.
An Advanced Placement (AP) course in calculus consists of a full high school year of work that is comparable to calculus courses in colleges and universities. It is expected that students who take an AP course in calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutions of higher learning.
Most colleges and universities offer a sequence of several courses in calculus, and entering students are placed within this sequence according to the extent of their preparation, as measured by the results of an AP examination or other criteria.
  • Review of Precalculus topics, including Trigonometry, Finding Limits Graphically and Numerically,
    Evaluating Limits Analytically, Continuity and One-Sided Limits, Infinite Limits, Differentiation, The Derivative and Tangent Line Problem, Basic Differentiation Rules and Rates of Change, The Product and Quotient Rules and Higher Order Derivatives, The Chain Rule, Implicit Differentiation
    Related Rates, Applications of Differentiation, Extrema on an Interval, Rolle's Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem, Increasing and Decreasing Functions and the First Derivative Test, Concavity and the Second Derivative Test, Limits at Infinity, Summary of Curve Sketching, Optimization Problems, Differentials and Linear Approximation, Integration, Antiderivatives and Indefinite Integration, Area, Riemann Sums and Definite Integrals, The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Average Value of a function and the Mean Value Theorem for Integrals, Integration by Substitution, Numerical Integration, The Integral as a Function, Logarithmic, Exponential, and Other Transcendental Functions., The Natural Logarithmic Function and Differentiation, The Natural Logarithmic Function and Integration, Inverse Functions, Exponential Functions:  Differentiation and Integration, Bases other than e and Applications, Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Differentiation, Differential Equations: Slope Fields, Differential Equations: Growth and Decay, Differential Equations: Separation of Variables, Applications of Integration, Area of Region between Two Curves, Volume: Disk Method, Basic Integration Rules, Integration Techniques, Indeterminate Forms and L'Hopital's Rule, AP Exam Review and Test Taking Tips and Practice
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math
Florida Virtual School: See FLVS section for enrollment procedures

 

1202320 Advanced Placment Calculus BC
Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to receive Advanced Placement credit and possible College credit.

This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus BC exam given each year in May.
An Advanced Placement (AP) course in calculus consists of a full high school year of work that is comparable to calculus courses in colleges and universities. It is expected that students who take an AP course in calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutions of higher learning.
Most colleges and universities offer a sequence of several courses in calculus, and entering students are placed within this sequence according to the extent of their preparation, as measured by the results of an AP examination or other criteria.
  • Finding Limits Graphically and Numerically, Evaluating Limits Analytically, Continuity and One-Sided Limits, Infinite Limits,  Differentiation,  The Derivative and Tangent Line Problem,  Basic Differentiation Rules and Rates of Change, The Product and Quotient Rules and Higher Order Derivatives,  The Chain Rule,  Implicit Differentiation,  Logarithmic Differentiation,  Related Rates,  Applications of Differentiation, Extrema on an Interval, Rolle's Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem, Increasing and Decreasing Functions and the First Derivative Test, Concavity and the Second Derivative Test, Limits at Infinity, Summary of Curve Sketching, Optimization Problems, Differentials and Linear Approximation, Integration, Antiderivatives and Indefinite Integration, Area, Riemann Sums and Definite Integrals, The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Average Value of a function and the Mean Value Theorem for Integrals, Integration by Substitution, Numerical Integration, The Integral as a Function, Logarithmic, Exponential, and Other Transcendental Functions, The Natural Logarithmic Function and Differentiation, The Natural Logarithmic Function and Integration, Inverse Functions, Exponential Functions:  Differentiation and Integration, Bases other than e and Applications, Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Differentiation, Differential Equations: Slope Fields, Differential Equations: Euler’s Method, Differential Equations: Growth and Decay, Differential Equations: Logistic Equations, Differential Equations: Separation of Variables,  Applications of Integration, Area of Region between Two Curves, Volume: Disk Method, Arc length, Work, Basic Integration Rules, Integration by Parts, Integration using Partial Fractions, Indeterminate Forms and L'Hopital's Rule, Improper Integrals, Sequences, Series and Convergence, Integral Test and p-series, Comparison of Series, Alternating Series, Ratio and Root Test, Taylor Polynomials and Approximations, LaGrange Error, Power Series, Representation of Functions by Power Series, Taylor and Maclaurin Series, Plane Curves and Parametric Equations, Differentiation and Integration of Parametric Equations, Arclength of a curve described by parametric equations, Polar Coordinates and Polar Graphs, Area bounded by Polar Graphs, Vector-valued Functions, Differentiation and Integration of Vector-valued functions, Velocity and Acceleration: motion, Tangent and Normal Vectors, Arclength of a vector valued function, AP Exam Review and Test Taking Tips and Practice
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math
Florida Virtual School: See FLVS section for enrollment procedures

 

1202340 Pre-Calculus
A full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic and conceptual geometric concepts covered in the prerequisite courses: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analytic geometry and trigonometry while investigating further relationships in functions, probability, number theory, limits, and the introduction of derivatives.
Upon successfully completing the course, students should have mastered the following concepts:
• Perform operations on functions including composition and inverses.
• Graph, evaluate, and solve exponential and logarithmic functions and equations.
• Utilize the unit circle in evaluating trigonometric identities; prove trigonometric identities; graph trigonometric functions and their inverses.
• Solve application problems involving right triangle trigonometry, special right triangles, and law of sines and cosines.
• Convert between Cartesian and polar forms; graph equations in polar coordinates.
• Graph and solve quadratic equations that include conic sections.
• Calculate probabilities, combinations, and permutations.
• Calculate summations and limits of functions.
• Relate analytical operations of limits, slope of a tangent line, and the definition of a derivative.
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 

1205370 Consumer Math
Applies computational skills to business related situations.  Topics shall include, but not be limited to, whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, measurements, and applications in business related situations such as payroll, banking, business records, and financial reports. This course does not meet the Algebra I requirement, or qualify as a math course for the FAS or FMS scholarships

 

1205540 Business Math
Applies computational skills to business related situations.  Topics shall include, but not be limited to, whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, measurements, and applications in business related situations such as payroll, banking, business records, and financial reports. This course does not meet the Algebra I requirement, or qualify as a math course for the FAS or FMS scholarships.

 

1206310 Geometry     Duplicate course Geometry Honors
A full year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Algebra I. The course focuses on the skills and methods of linear, coordinate, and plane geometry. In it, students will gain solid experience with geometric calculations and coordinate plane graphing, methods of formal proof, and techniques of construction.
By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:
• Understand defined terms, axioms, postulates, and theories.
• Apply rules of formal logic and construct proofs in two-column format.
• Know how to solve for angles given parallels, perpendiculars, and transversals.
• Demonstrate how to solve for sides and angles of triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons.
• Understand trigonometric ratios and know how to use them to solve for unknown sides and angles in given triangles as well as application word problems.
• Be able to determine arcs, chords, and sectors of circles.
• Calculate perimeter, area, and volume of figures and solids.
• Graph lines and determine slopes, midpoints, and distances.
• Make geometric constructions on paper.
• Represent results of motion geometry (translation, rotation, reflection, dilation).
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 

1206320 Geometry Honors     Duplicate course Geometry
This course gives a rigorous in-depth study of geometry with emphasis on methods of proof and formal language of Topics shall include, but not be limited to:
• constructing and determining the validity of logical statements; construction of various abstract geometric objects;
• transforming geometric objects on the Euclidian and Descartes plane;
• proving theorems involving the intersection of parallel lines and segments;
• proving theorems involving triangles, quadrilaterals, & circles and their inherent properties and then use these properties to solve problems involving these figures;
• solving problems involving the use of the Pythagorean Theorem, and the Sine, Cosine, and Tangent ratios;
• proving the validity of the Law of Sines and then use it and the Law of Cosines to find unknown measures in triangles;
• proving theorems involving quadrilaterals and their inherent properties and then use these properties to solve problems involving quadrilaterals;
• deriving and applying formulas for finding perimeter, area, volume, & surface area; deriving the equations of the parabola, hyperbola, and ellipse.

 

1206330 Analytic Geometry      .5 credit
Provides students with the study of circular and trigonometric functions and their applications.  Topics shall include, but not be limited to, trigonometric identities graphs of trigonometric functions, inverses of circular functions, particular and general solutions of trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles and vectors.

 

1208300 Liberal Arts Math
Liberal Arts Mathematics 1 is a course designed to strengthen mathematical skills for study beyond Algebra 1. The course can be taken either before or after Algebra 1.
The topics include, but are not limited to:
• linear equations and inequalities,
• operations with polynomials,
• data representation and analysis,
• geometric constructions,
• symmetry,
• similarity,
• systems of linear equations and inequalities,
• functions,
• quadratic equations,
• exponential equations,
• rational equations,
• radical equations, and
• graphing equations and functions.

 

1210320 Advanced Placment Statistics     Prerequisite: Algebra II "B" or higher
Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to receive Advanced Placement credit and possible College credit.

This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Statistics exam given each year in May.
An Advanced Placement (AP) course in calculus consists of a full high school year of work that is comparable to calculus courses in colleges and universities. It is expected that students who take an AP course in calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutions of higher learning.
Most colleges and universities offer a sequence of several courses in calculus, and entering students are placed within this sequence according to the extent of their preparation, as measured by the results of an AP examination or other criteria.
  • Dotplots, stemplots (back-to-back stemplots), histograms, cumulative frequency plots, and parallel boxplots, Center, shape, spread, clusters, gaps, outliers and other unusual features, Position using quartiles, percentiles, and standardized (z) scores, Boxplots (and modified) with the five number summary, Center and spread both within a group and between groups, Position of different distributions using standardization, Correlation and linearity, Least-squares regression lines, Transformations to achieve linearity (logarithmic and power), Marginal and joint frequencies for two-way tables, Conditional relative frequencies and determine association, Distributions in bar charts and residual plots, Populations, samples, and random selection, Sources of bias in sampling and surveys (undercoverage, voluntary response, including confounding variables, the placebo effect, and blinding), Sampling methods (simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, and cluster sampling), Treatments, control groups, experimental units, random assignments, and replication, Completely randomized designs, Different experimental designs (randomized block design, matched pairs design), Generalize results from collected data, Probability models, Long-run relative frequencies, Law of Large Numbers, Independence and disjoint, Conditional probability, Mean and standard deviation for sums and differences of independent random variables, Binomial and Geometrical distribution, finding the mean and standard deviation, Properties of the normal distribution as a model for measurements, Sampling distribution of a sample proportion and sample mean, Central Limit Theorem, Sampling distribution of a difference between two sample proportions and means, Conduct significance tests, Probabilities in Type I, Type II errors, and Power, Confidence intervals and significance tests of means (both 1 sample and 2 sample), Sample size for a desired margin of error, Confidence intervals and significance tests of proportions (both 1 sample and 2 sample), Determine sample size for a desired margin of error, Chi-squared goodness of fit and chi-squared test of independence, Assumptions for inference for regression or a linear regression test, Conduct significance tests for linear regressions, Useful language for symbolically modeling and thus simplifying and analyzing our world, Mathematics is a logical and objective means of analyzing and solving problems, Effective communication of mathematics is essential to its application, Analysis of data makes use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns and departures from patterns, Data must be collected according to a well-developed plan if valid information is to be obtained, Probability is the tool used for anticipating what the distribution of data should look like under a given model, Statistical inference guides decision making
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math
Florida Virtual School: See FLVS section for enrollment procedures

 

 

1211300 Trigonometry     .5 credit
Trigonometry is for high school students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The materials cover a development of trigonometry from right triangle trigonometry to oblique triangles and the polar plane. Throughout the course, students will develop trigonometric formulas and use them in real-world applications, evaluate trigonometric proofs using complex trigonometric identities and solving trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.
The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills so that they may achieve the following goals:
• Use trigonometry as a tool for indirect measurement.
• Model natural phenomenon with trigonometric functions.
• Perform operations with complex numbers using trigonometry.
• Use trigonometric identities to evaluate trigonometric proofs and solve trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.
• Solve for unknown sides and angles of right and oblique triangles using right triangle trigonometry, law of sines and law of cosines.
In attaining these goals, students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and understand how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Math

 

PARTIAL LISTING OF MATH DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES
The student must have passed the Algebra portion of the PERT test before they will be allowed to enroll in math courses at the college level. For most students that means having earned a B or better in Algebra II.

This college Dual Enrollment Course, is counted as two one half credit grades equaling one credit, per Florida Department of Education guidelines.

FLDOE Dual Enrollment Course List

 


MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra
3 hours Lecture,
3 college credits
Lower-Division College Credit (This is the review course and does not count as an upper level math course for the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship)
Prerequisites: MAT 0024 or appropriate placement examination score
This course provides the foundation for higher-level courses in algebra through the development of algebraic skills, as well as examination of the basic mathematical principles underlying those skills. The course topics include factoring, rational expressions, linear and quadratic equations, rational exponents, radical expressions, graphing, systems of equations and inequalities, complex numbers, rational equations, functions, proportion and variation, and applications.


MAC 1105 College Algebra
3 hours Lecture,
3 college credits, 1 high school credit
Lower-Division College Credit
Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 1033, or appropriate placement examination score
This course is intended for students whose programs of study require a strong background in college algebra, or those who need preparation for more advanced mathematics courses. Topics include general properties of functions; the graphs of linear, absolute value, quadratic, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; equations and inequalities associated with these functions; graphs and equations of circles; and systems of equations and inequalities. A graphing calculator (TI-83 or equivalent) is required.


MAC 1114 Trigonometry
3 hours Lecture,
3 college credits, 1 high school credit
Lower-Division College Credit
Prerequisites: MAC 1105 or appropriate placement examination score
This course is intended for those students whose programs of study require trigonometry, or those who are preparing for higher mathematics. Students with a weak background in algebra may find the work difficult. Topics include properties and graphs of trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric equations and trigonometric identities, solutions of triangles, as well as applications of trigonometry to vectors, complex numbers, and polar coordinates. A graphing calculator (TI-83 or equivalent) is required.


MAC 1140 Pre-Calculus Algebra
3 hours Lecture,
3 college credits, 1 high school credit
Lower-Division College Credit
Prerequisites: MAC 1105 or appropriate placement examination score
This course is intended for students whose programs of study require advanced algebra, or those who need preparation for Calculus I (MAC2311). Topics include: properties of functions and relations; the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; matrices; determinants; mathematical induction; sequences and series; and conic sections. A graphing calculator (TI-83 or equivalent) is required.


MAC 1147 Pre-Calculus Algebra/Trigonometry
5 hours Lecture,
5 college credits, 1 high school credit
Lower-Division College Credit
Prerequisites: A grade of B or better in MAC 1105 or appropriate placement examination score
This course satisfies the dual requirements of Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) and Trigonometry (MAC 1114), and thus prepares the student for Calculus I (MAC 2311). Precalculus topics include the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; and sequences and series. Trigonometry topics include the study of the trigonometric functions and their graphs, as well as identities, applications of trigonometry, solutions of triangles, complex numbers, and polar graphs. This course requires that students devote time to an intensive study of these topics. A graphing calculator (TI-83 or equivalent) is required.


MAC 2233 Applied Calculus I
3 hours Lecture,
3 college credits, 1 high school credit
Lower-Division College Credit
Prerequisites: MAC 1105 or appropriate placement examination score
This course provides the calculus needed by students in business, technologies, social sciences, and other areas that do not require a complete, detailed study of calculus. It is not intended as the first course in a complete series or as a substitute for a complete course in calculus. Topics include a study of limits and rate of change, as well as differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with particular emphasis on applications. This course is not designed to satisfy the calculus requirement for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. A graphing calculator (TI-83 or equivalent) is required.


MAC 2311 Calculus I
5 hours Lecture,
5 college credits, 1 high school credit
Lower-Division College Credit
Prerequisites: MAC 1140 and MAC 1114, or MAC 1147, or appropriate placement examination score
This course provides a study of limits, differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions; and applications involving the analysis of graphs, optimization, approximation, and rates of change. Students who enroll should have a strong background in algebra, plane geometry, and trigonometry. This course is essential to students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering programs. Success in this course depends on a strong foundation in algebra and a willingness to devote ample time to studying and working problems. A graphing calculator (TI-83 or equivalent) is required.

 

There are additional Dual Enrollment courses that earn high school credits.
For a detailed list, refer to the FLDOE Dual Enrollment Course List